US Naturalization Documents Overview


Let’s take a quick look at the 4 types of US Naturalization documents you need to know about for your jure sanguinis application. I will be creating more videos and articles soon to explain exactly how to find and order each of these documents, so stay tuned :)  Please note that each Consulate Office has different requirements for which of these documents are needed for jure sanguines, so please make sure to check with your Consul before decided which documents to order.

Declaration of Intention

The Declaration of Intention to naturalize would have been Step One of the citizenship process for your ancestor.  The document looks something like this:

Basically, this is a piece of paper that formally registered your ancestors intention to become a naturalised US citizen. After filing the declaration, your ancestor would have to wait some requisite amount of time – normally between 1 and 3 years – before going to step 2 of the naturalisation process.

Where to find it?

Naturalizations Pre 1906:

  • Federal, state, county, and local courts where the record was filed
  • Contact the State Archives for the state where the naturalization occurred to request a search of state, county, and local courts records.
  • Contact the NARA regional facility that serves the state where naturalization occurred to request a search of Federal court records

Naturalizations After 1906:

Petition for Naturalization 

Once your ancestor filed the Declaration of intention and waited the requisite amount of time, he or she could formally file for a petition for naturalisation, sometimes called a petition for citizenship.

This document looks like this:

Where to find it?

Naturalizations Pre 1906:

  • Federal, state, county, and local courts where the record was filed
  • Contact the State Archives for the state where the naturalization occurred to request a search of state, county, and local courts records.
  • Contact the NARA regional facility that serves the state where naturalization occurred to request a search of Federal court records

Naturalizations After 1906:

Oath of Allegiance

This is the pledge your ancestor would have had to take to swear allegiance to the United States before he/she would be issued a Certificate of Naturalization.  The oath looks something like this:

If you already have your ancestor’s Oath in possession, congratulations!  For our purposes, the most important part of the oath is found at the bottom… If you have your ancestor’s Oath of allegiance, look for the Certificate Number – or C-File number – at the bottom right hand corner of the document.  This will help you later on if you need to request the Certificate of Naturalization.  I will explain what I mean by C-File numbers and all of that in more detail in a later article.

Where to find it?

Naturalizations Pre 1906:

  • Federal, state, county, and local courts where the record was filed
  • Contact the State Archives for the state where the naturalization occurred to request a search of state, county, and local courts records.
  • Contact the NARA regional facility that serves the state where naturalization occurred to request a search of Federal court records

Naturalizations After 1906:

Certificate of Naturalization

Finally, we come to the Certificate of Naturalization.  The Certificate of Naturalisation is the document issued after a US citizen hopeful completes all of the citizenship requirements and has signed the oath of allegiance to the United States.  In other words, this certificate shows that the naturalisation is DONE DEAL.

The Certificate of Naturalization looks something like this:

This document is required by many Consulate offices, and is only available via United States Citizenship and Immigration Services USCIS website. However, USCIS only holds Certificate of Naturalisation (c-file) records for naturalisations that occurred between  September 27, 1906 – March 31, 2956.  In other words, NARA and the local Courthouse can’t provide this document.

Where to find it?

Naturalization between September 27, 1906 – March 31, 1956

Thanks for reading!  Hope this was helpful :)

12 Comments

  1. Under Certificate:
    “…between September 27, 1906 – March 31, 2956.” I think you may mean 1956…

    Also, where do you find this document if the naturalization occurred more recently than this, say, in the mid-70’s?

  2. I have copies of my grandfather’s Declaration of Intention, Petition for Naturalization, and Naturalization Documents. My concern is that the Declaration of Intention states his “intention to renounce forever…”
    Given that my father was born between that document and the actual Naturalization, am I still eligible? Should I leave the Declaration of Intention and Petition out of my packet of documents for the consulate?
    Grazia.

      1. I get that I’m in the clear, but should I include or exclude the docs other than the Naturalization out of my portfolio when I go to the consulate?

  3. The Petition for Naturalization and the Declaration of Intention both have my grandfather stating that as a condition for US citizenship, he “intends” to renounce his allegiance to Italy. I have copies of those that were provided by INS and they are dated prior to my father’s birth. The Naturalization copy, also from INS is after my father was born.
    Does his “intention” cause a problem for me and should I bring or not bring the paperwork that express that “intention”

  4. I also have the same concern – on the Declaration & Oath of Allegiance, my grandfather states explicitly that he will renounce “allegiance and fidelity” … to: ITALY.

    Jure Sanguinis explicitly requires that the family members in your bloodline have never renounced their citizenship to Italy. I assume that it means: if he never visited an embassy of Italy or Italian government office to formally renounce his citizenship, then the Italian government still recognizes him as a citizen in spite of his oath of allegiance to the United States.

    Is this clear?

  5. For my Italian Immigrant, I already have copies from NARA of the Declaration of Intention, Petition For Naturalization, and the Oath of Alligence. The Certificate of Naturalization number on the oath is legible.

    Is there any reason why I should not just submit a “Record Request without Request Case ID”? The USCIS website says that an ancestor may have multiple records, that would only be turned up with an Index search.

  6. Hello, I’ve found all the documents I’ll need on ancestry including the c number. Will all of these docs need to be officially requested from USCIS? or are there any I can just print color copies of?

  7. Hi there, thanks for this website. I was wondering what documents will be necessary and from which organizations, if I haven’t been able to find any sort of naturalization records? Thanks.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

YouTube
Instagram
TWITTER
Google+
http://diyitaliancitizenship.com/us-naturalization-documents-overview
FACEBOOK
RSS